2017 Conference Schedule

IDENTIFYING GAPS: Unlocking Potential

April 18, 19, 20 & 21, 2017
Hilton Niagara Suites
Niagara Falls, ON

For information about the Research Special Interest Group (RSIG) seminar RSIG page.

A copy of the conference brochure will be available shortly.

If you would like more information about the presentations or the conference please contact the OADD office at oadd@oadd.org

  • to register for the conference click here
  • to book accommodations at the Hilton Niagara at a reduced conference rate click here

 

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017 – Pre-Conference Seminar hosted by GLS

7:30am 9:00am Registration & Breakfast
9:00am 9:15am Welcoming Remarks and Introduction to the Day GLS Board
9:15am 11:00am

Demographic Issues and Service Gaps for Youth

Dr. Vikram Dua, Clinical Director Surrey Place Centre

11:00am 11:20am Break
11:20am 12:15pm Session Continues
12:15pm 1:00pm Hosted Lunch
1:00pm 2:50pm

Lessons Learned to Improve Services, Supports and Safety for individuals with Complex Needs

Gerry Bernicky, Director & Vikk Dua, Clinical Director

Treatment, Research and Education for Autism and Developmental Disorders (TRE-ADD) of Surrey Place Centre, provides day treatment within Section 23 classrooms in Toronto and Peel regions in both elementary and secondary programs. The individuals served in this specialized program are students from Toronto, Peel and York school boards, who present with severe and complex behaviours.  The behaviours typically observed and lead to referrals to TRE-ADD are physical aggression to others, property destruction, self-injury, and/or other.  Often, these students may have shortened school days, suspensions, or additional staffing provided by the current boards to help manage while seeking treatment and supports.  For TRE-ADD providing interdisciplinary assessment and treatment services to such individuals grouped together in several classrooms presents higher risks such as classroom disruptions, staff injuries, and staff burnout due to the intensity of services required to provide on a daily basis.  These risks have been experienced in the TRE-ADD program and resulted in our completing an internal and external program review and then working through recommendations identified to redesign the program to continue to meet the needs of those referred while reducing risks as the service provider.  This presentation will share our journey and lessons learned including changes we have made and why, how these were implemented and where we are heading to ensure high quality services to support individuals with complex needs and addressing staff safety/injury reduction.

This presentation will be of interest to those who deliver services directly to individuals with complex needs and those who manage and support such staff. Clinical and management structures and processes will be discussed and shared throughout the presentation.

2:50pm 3:00pm Closing Remarks & Evaluation
7:00pm 10pm Welcome Reception

A chance to catch up with friend in the Myst Lounge overlooking the Falls

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

7:30am 8:45am Registration & Breakfast Foyer – Great Falls Ballroom
8:45am 9:00am Opening Remarks – OADD Board Chair Great Falls Ballroom
9:00am 10:15am Keynote Speaker

Mr Paul Dubé, Ontario Ombudsman (or representative)
“The Ombudsman’s Report: No Where to Turn” Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Crisis

Great Falls Ballroom
10:15am 10:30am Break
10:30am 11:45am Concurrent Sessions “1”
1A
My Information, My Decision
Presenter: Donna Lee, Cathy Deagle Gammon

An important aspect of supporting the health and wellbeing of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is ensuring that service providers have the information they need about the person’s health, medications, behaviours and risks. Historically, information has too often been shared across environments (residential, school, work, day program, healthcare) without sufficient concern for the individual’s right to decide who has access to their personal information. Recently, more attention has been paid to ensuring that consent forms are signed, however, too often people with ID are not provided the opportunity to consent for themselves, or are inadequately informed of what they are consenting to.

Often consent to share such information is treated as a form to sign, or a task that automatically requires familial oversight. Ensuring people are equipped to make decisions regarding whether or not to consent to the sharing of their personal information can be difficult when they have not had the educational opportunities to learn what informed consent is all about.

This presentation will examine the gaps in consent processes related to sharing the personal and health information of people with ID, and will provide examples of effective practices to address these issues. The presenter will share the dynamic training curriculum developed at DASC to teach the people supported in their agency about informed consent. A video of people participating in the training will be shown to demonstrate the teaching methods and a sample curriculum for teaching people with ID about informed consent will be shared to facilitate implementation of similar training in participants’ own agencies.

Lake Ontario Room
1B
ConnectABILITY.ca – A Collaboration supporting individualswith developmental disabilities across Ontario
Presenters: Don Murray, Jason Maher, Jennifer Altosaar
There is a lot of information out there. The problems are finding it and knowing whether it is trustworthy and useful. That takes time to sort out – one of things that is in short supply. ConnectABILITY.ca is a free online public self-help library. ConnectABILITY.ca gathers and shares the expertise from across the developmental service sector and other sectors – with easy navigation and searching all from one site. It is for individuals with developmental disabilities, their families and supports. On a high level it is organized around life’s major transitions. When you drill down to the next level the content is sorted by topic for ease of finding the material you are interested in. The people writing the content are staff who are working on the front line delivering supports to individuals and their families. They are sharing their expertise in a ‘how to’ format that enables others – families, individuals and professionals – to take action themselves using best practice models. Staff from more than 30 organizations has contributed in the creation of the content presented on ConnectABILITY.ca. From its beginnings as a Toronto area resource, ConnectABILITY.ca is reaching out to partner with all regions to be a province wide resource for people with a developmental disability, their families and supports. This presentation will take you through the resources supporting each transition, how content is created, how ConnectABILITY.ca is managed, and how you can get involved and partner to help make the vision of a province wide resource become a reality.
Lake Michigan Room
1C
The Coaching Connection: Educator Experiences with Collaborative Job-Embedded Training
Presenter: Kathy Ann Wlodarczyk

Many elementary and secondary schools in Ontario provide specialized programming for children with developmental disabilities, in support of inclusive education. However, educators require support to adapt their practices to make classrooms more inclusive.

Job-embedded professional development using coaching partnerships presents promising alternative to traditional methods for changing practice (e.g., formal training, workshops). This research examined two practice improvement projects (Partnering for Change and Learning for All), in which classroom coaching was implemented in four Ontario school boards. Coaches with training in either occupational therapy or special education worked in the classroom with educators to collaboratively problem solve, suggest, model and support the application of strategies to facilitate inclusion using differentiated instruction, universal design for learning and evidence-based practice techniques. A qualitative description study of educator experience with job-embedded coaching was conducted, involving interviews of 21 educators in coaching partnerships within their respective schools. Thematic analysis of educator accounts illustrates characteristics of the coaching relationship that were helpful for informing inclusive practice and provide better understanding about the competencies an effective coach encompasses in this context. Findings from this research provide insight into important factors for creating coaching partnerships to build educator capacity and translate knowledge in the school context.

Lake Erie Room
1D
Building an Intentional Community
Presenters: James Sejjengo, Simi Singh, Brenda Elias, Daniel Duschinsky

Reena Community Residence is an innovative housing model that provides integrated support services to a mixed community of adults aged 18 to 88 with physical, developmental and mental health needs.

A research project was designed over a 5-year period to explore the long term physical, psychological, emotional and social responses of a diverse population with special needs as they transition from various residential settings to a new “Intentional Community with Supports”.

In 2012, Reena opened a four-story apartment building with program space on the main floor dedicated to enhance life skills for everyone. The apartments support up to 84 adults with a seamless integrated service delivery model. Partners in this Intentional Community model have included March Of Dimes Canada, Circle of Care, the Central Local Health Integration Network and Community Care Access Centre.

The research component continues to tap into this unique opportunity to evaluate how tenants transition from community settings to the new Reena Community Residence. An important success indicator is the lived experience of those who relocate to and adapt within their new home and whether these tenants embrace a common social vision that places importance on living and sharing life together and whether these activities influence their perceptions of their own health.

After attending this session participants will be able to learn about an intentional community at Reena Community Residence and how it looks like, gain an understanding of a unique integrated service delivery model and become aware of the lived experience of a diverse group of tenants who embrace a common social vision.

Lake Huron Room
12:00pm 1:00pm Hosted Lunch Watermark Restaurant
1:15pm 2:30pm Concurrent Sessions “2”
2A
Ethical Challenges and Considerations when Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disabilities who Sexually Abuse in Community Settings
Presenters: Christa Outhwaite-Salmon, Tiffany Charbonneau

Ethical challenges are often encountered when providing assessment, treatment and support to persons with an Intellectual Disability who reside in community settings and who have engaged in sexually abusive behaviours. Often further complications are experienced when implementing policies and procedures that can affect individual’s rights and quality of life. In the area of assessment and treatment, many ethical decisions are made in order to ensure fairness and accuracy within the context of community safety. The Program for the Assessment and Treatment of Healthy Sexuality (P.A.T.H.S) abides by the ethical standards of the Applied Behaviour Analyst Association, the Association for the Treatment for Sexual Abusers (ATSA), and the Principles of Biomedical Ethics (1994) to guide our practice. Biomedical Ethics outlines four principals which practitioners should adhere to when resolving ethical issues (Beauchamp & Childress, 1994). These principals are autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance, and justice.

This workshop will closely examine the principals of Biomedical Ethics and their application to the assessment and treatment of this population. Specifically, case study examples will illustrate ethical issues and challenges our clinicians have faced in abiding by these principles while supporting individuals in community settings, with emphasis on how the principals have helped guide the decision making process and best practice interventions.

Lake Ontario room
2B
Specialized Service Navigation
Presenter: Karen White, Jian Li, Aaron Firth

In order to effectively respond to a large volume of calls and requests, we have specialized Service Navigators on our team. This approach has pros and cons to be discussed and elaborated on during the discussion.

Lake Michigan Room
2C
Increasing Community Capacity and Supporting Smooth Transitions-Creating an Effective Education Series
Presenters: Jennifer Altosaar, Megan Primeau, Jason Maher

The Transition Series was a 3 part series for direct support professionals to help meet the complex needs related to Transition Planning. This was a partnership between Community Network of Specialized Care-Toronto Region, Developmental Services Toronto and ConnectABILITY.ca. In attendance were 105 staff from developmental service agencies as well as community partners from health, education and justice.

The Learning Objectives of this session are:

  •  Describe the main features and results of the Transitions Series education event
  •  Discuss the key factors to develop and deliver meaningful educational events
  •  Discuss the role of community partners in the Knowledge Transfer process

We will be highlighting the “Toolkit for Planning Education Events” a very comprehensive resource that assists in the planning, development and delivery of education events for adult that provides a meaningful experience for all.

Lake Erie Room
2D
Bearing Witness
Presenter: Donna Lee, Cathy Deagle Gammon

Research shows that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at significant risk of abuse and other crimes. As the criminal justice system has improved its response to such crimes, more and more cases of abuse against people with ID are being prosecuted. At the same time, there is a growing recognition within the justice system of the value of the knowledge held by direct support professionals in cases that involve people with ID. As such, staff may be called upon to testify, perhaps in regards to an aspect of the crime, but more often to provide information that sheds light on the person with ID’s abilities and limitations, their character, their ability to tell the truth, and their communication needs. Attorneys may also look to staff to help identify supports the individual requires to participate as fully as possible in the court process.

At the end of the presentation participants will be able to:

  • Understand their responsibilities to the court, to their staff and to the individual receiving service.
  • Develop practices and policies that ensure that clients with ID are informed about confidentiality, and limits to confidentiality, as they pertain to staff or documents subpoenaed by court.
  • Describe the importance of how and what we document in relation to the lives of people with IDD/MI and how this documentation may be used in court.
  • Understand court processes and the rights of both clients and agencies involved in these processes.
  • Effectively support staff who are called to testify in a way that helps to ensure justice for the people they serve.
2:30pm 2:45pm Break
2:45pm 4:00pm Concurrent Session “3”
3A
Awakening Imagination in Adults with Developmental Disabilities
Presenters: Heidi Argyle, Olena Darewych

This presentation stages the Salvation Army Lawson Ministries – Paparella Innovation Art Program which is an established, recognized community-based expressive arts program in Downtown Hamilton for adults with developmental disabilities. Members of the programs gain exposure to a variety of art media, engage in social interaction, maintain their imaginative abilities and express themselves through paint, music, and movement.  The art skills gained by members are transferable and helpful in other life and social areas.

During the presentation, attendees will learn about the Paparella program’s development strategy, creative arts framework, collaborative partnerships which ensure community growth, inclusion of art therapy which focuses on skill building, current digital art therapy research being conducted and program growth to make the downtown centre a community based-arts hive. Finally, attendees will learn about designing art fundraising initiatives to create sustainable arts programming. Information will allow attendees to understand the role of creative arts in the developmental services community and skills to implement successful arts programming within their own services.  The presenters will share with attendees’ examples of the Paparella artists’ creations and a video portraying the program’s most recent Quilt and Mosaic projects.

Lake Ontario Room
3B
Dual Diagnosis and the Criminal Justice System: Collaboration across the sectors
Presenters: Samantha Stromski, Allison Hibbett

Bethesda’s Dual Diagnosis Justice Case Management Program (DDJCM) can be a point of access to connect individuals with a dual diagnosis to community based services when transitioning out of the Criminal Justice System. This presentation will provide an outline of the role of the DDJCM program and explore the barriers and service gaps that exist across various service sectors such as developmental services, mental health and justice services. More specifically, this presentation will examine possible solutions to these barriers and how transition planning from custody can be collaborative process among various community providers. Recommendations will be provided in terms of how differing service sectors can creatively problem solve with other community partners to bridge supports and services that will not only assist individuals with a dual diagnosis in navigating the various stages of the Criminal Justice System but provide successful transitioning back into the community. With an increase in community collaboration it is the hope that there will be a reduced rate of recidivism among this population

Lake Michigan room
3C
VolunTeens: Supporting Youth to Navigate Transition to Vocational Opportunities
Presenter: Katie Nicholson

Group and Transition Services at Geneva Centre for Autism focuses primarily on recreation, social skill building, and pre-vocational based programming for children and youth aged 2 to 18 years old. Current research indicates that the success of individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the workplace increases when on-the-job training is provided. As part of a recent service review, an opportunity to further develop youth’s pre-vocational skills in a recreational setting was identified.

VolunTeens is a curriculum based program that focuses on independence, flexibility, communication, and teamwork skills, and leads to the development and increase of pre-vocational skills for youth with ASD.

Participants will explore career opportunities in the community and develop job readiness skills. This program includes lessons, using mentoring and modeling, as well as experiential components in the form of volunteer placements. The presenters will review the program design, components, objectives, curriculum development, ABA strategies, and data collection used to support participants in detail. In addition, presenters will share the challenges, and future steps within both the planning and implementation phases of the program.

3D
Effective Communication with Families during times of Transition
Presenter: Lisa Benrubi

Each transition, from a toddler’s move to independence, to the first day of daycare, and eventual graduation from school requires that parents and their children be introduced to new environments, new people, and new experiences. It can be a time of excitement, growth, and change.

For families with special needs children however, these transitions can create a time of confusion, and a feeling of loss and uncertainty. The system of supports and services families become familiar with, and develop deep relationships in are challenged during the transitions from early years to school age services, and again from the Children’s to Adult’s services system.

Effective communication with our families during these vulnerable times is the ‘ glue’ that binds our connection to our clients and fosters our success in teamwork, problem solving and decision making. It can be the difference between a healthy trusting relationship and one fraught with misunderstanding, frustration and stalled progress.

This workshop will discuss the complex transitions our families must navigate, and the ways in which effective communication skills can ensure the language we both speak doesn’t get lost in translation. We will discuss communication styles, managing conflict when things go sideways, and communication tools that can be integrated in our practice.

Lake Huron Room
7:30pm 10:00pm Networking Event
This event is planned as a perfect way to end the day, relaxing with friends, old and new.
Executive Games Room

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

7:30am 9:00am OADD Registration & Breakfast Foyer – Great Falls Ballroom
9:00am 10:15am Invited Speaker

Assistant Deputy Minister Karen Chan of the Ministry of Community and Social Services

Vibrant Living – Improving Outcomes for Adults with a Developmental Disability through Person-Centred Approaches

Great Falls Ballroom
10:15am 10:30am Break
10:30am 11:45am Concurrent Sessions “4”
4A

Improving Service Experience for Adults with Developmental Disabilities: An Interactive Workshop

Presenter: ADM Karen Chan

Lake Ontario Room
4B
Serving Homeless Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Preliminary findings from the Bridges to Housing Program
Presenters: Denise Lamanna, Dr. Sylvain Roy, Dr. Yona Lunsky, Denise Dubois

Introduction: Homeless people are significantly more likely to have an intellectual or developmental disability (IDD) (Oakes & Davies, 2008). As compared to the general homeless population, those with IDD experience higher levels of personal problems, and multiple barriers in accessing health and social services (Leedham, 2002). These patterns underscore the need for streamlined access to services to support housing stability.

The Bridges to Housing (BTH) program is a cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary initiative led by City of

Toronto along with other partnering agencies to identify 25 homeless individuals with IDD and creatively engage them in transitioning from shelter to stable housing along with providing direct linkages to specialized and personalized supports and healthcare.

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to explore service provider perspectives on the facilitators and barriers of implementing a cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary housing initiative for this disadvantaged population.

Methods: Using semi-structured interview guides, in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 service providers (4 program managers and 9 frontline workers) involved in the BTH program. We use thematic content analysis to analyze data.

Results: Preliminary review of the interview recordings suggest that while having a multidisciplinary team with cross-sectoral expertise such as neuropsychology, nursing, case management and personal support is a facilitating factor, difficulties in partnership building (e.g. Lack of trust, role clarity, lack of openness) and systemic gaps (like lack of supportive housing) hinder service delivery towards this population

Lake Michigan Room
4C
Building Employer Capacity – Part One Advancing Employment Opportunity for Persons with Developmental Disabilities
Presenter: Marghalara Rashid

There is a significant body of literature on the value of supported employment and its significance for employers, and perceived potential challenges in employing individuals with developmental disabilities (DD). However, there has been no knowledge synthesis related to building employer capacity in this area. This synthesis review identifies studies focusing on services and supports to help build employers’ capacity to support vocational opportunities for adults with DD. The search was conducted in EBSCO UAlberta Library, which automatically includes more than 50 electronic bibliographic databases. Two reviewers independently screened for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed study quality. Inclusion criteria were: (1) peer-reviewed literature, (2) English-language, (3) individuals with DD, and (4) employers and colleagues’ perspectives. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Findings from this study illustrated that involvement of support workers’ was viewed as the main strategy for building employer capacity. In addition, disability awareness training and education, and acknowledgment of psychosocial benefits associated with of employing individuals with disabilities were identified as supports. Employer concerns related to employees with disabilities were also identified. There is a significant body of literature on the value of supported employment and its significance for employers, as well as a few studies addressing perceived challenges associated with employing individuals with DD. Findings from this synthesis review notably indicate a lack of research focused on understanding employer’s perspectives of what is vital to develop their capacity to support vocational opportunities for adults with DD.

Co-Authors of the paper are: Sandra Hodgetts, David Nicholas

Lake Erie Room
4D
Navigating life – Real Stories from Real people living with a developmental disability
Presenters: David Hill, Daniel Beimers, Vicky Pearson

Over the past several years’ members of The New Vision Advocates (NVA) have been speaking to members of their communities, elementary school students, College and University students and conference participants on various issues that affect people with developmental disabilities.

The feedback from these presentations has been very positive, with one common suggestion – People want to hear real life experiences.

This year, members of NVA would like to do something a little different. The audience will meet members of the New Vision Advocates who will share their personal life experiences of living life with a disability, the challenges, barriers and successes each have faced. The supports and services they have had and may still have throughout the many transitions of life. What worked for them, what didn’t work and suggestions on filling in the gaps

Lake Huron Room
12:00pm 2:00pm Lunch
12:00pm Opening Address
12:30pm – 1:00pm OADD Awards Presentation
1:00pm Buffet Lunch
1:45pm OADD Annual General Meeting
Watermark Restaurant
2:15pm 3:30pm Concurrent Sessions “5”
5A
Falls Screening & Prevention: Building Community Capacity to Increase Access to Care and Reduce Fall Risk Factors
Presenter: Erin Thompson, Nicole Bobbette

Adults with Developmental Disabilities (DD) are vulnerable to experiencing falls and are at higher risk than the general population to be injured from falling.  Factors such as impaired mobility, sedentary lifestyle, age, medication use and health conditions such as epilepsy contribute to increased falls risk. Falling often impacts self confidence which can lead to a decline in general mobility, limiting participation and impacting overall quality of life. A fall can also result in serious physical injury, hospitalization, a need for alternative level of care and even death. Health care providers have been tasked with providing increased falls prevention screening and intervention to those individuals at increased risk of falling.

Although identified as a high risk population, it is not currently known if adults with DD access general falls screening and prevention programs and if these interventions result in a reduction in falls or fall risk factors.

This session will cover personal and environmental factors that may increase falls risk; however, focus will be placed on discussing interventions to decrease or prevent falls. Topics will include: environmental modification, health and medication management, as well as, exercise interventions to improve mobility. Local resources and tips for working with health care providers will also be reviewed. The goals of this presentation are to increase awareness of the potential impact of falls for adults with DD along the lifespan and improve our capacity to support these individuals in accessing regular screening, as well as, participating in valuable fall risk prevention activities.

Lake Ontario Room
5B
Working Together to Support Transitions: Families’ Stories of Choice and Independence
Presenters: Whitney Taylor, Ashleigh Blinkhorn, Helene Ouellette-Kuntz, Virginie Cobigo

This interactive session offers the opportunity to discuss families’ experiences as a family member with an intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) transitions into adulthood. The discussion will be informed by the viewing of two documentary films from “Working Together to Support Transitions,” a longitudinal case study that exemplifies families’ challenges and successes during critical changes for their adult family member with IDD.

The study raises issues for discussion including parents’ worry about their son or daughter’s vulnerability to harm, access to formal and informal supports, and quality of life. The way some parents feel challenged to balance their instinct to protect their son or daughter with their desire to promote his or her independence and quality of life will be highlighted. The session will also examine the sometimes extensive efforts of families to access services as their support needs change. Another key observation requiring consideration is that, amidst these challenges, family members with IDD are not always involved in making decisions for the events that will directly affect their lives.

This study is embedded in the Multidimensional Assessment of Providers and Systems (MAPS), a provincial research program directed by Dr. Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz. This session will promote awareness of the way families make choices for the transition, access services, cope with mental and health crises, and adjust to their new stage of life. Session participants will also have the opportunity to share their expertise in supporting families during times of transition.

Lake Michigan Room
5C
Building Employers’ Capacity – Part Two Supporting Vocational Opportunities for Adults with Developmental Disabilities: A Synthesis Review of Practices, Strategies and Perceptions
Presenter: Marghalara Rashid

There is a significant body of literature on the value of supported employment and its significance for employers, and perceived potential challenges in employing individuals with developmental disabilities (DD). However, there has been no knowledge synthesis related to building employer capacity in this area. This synthesis review identifies studies focusing on services and supports to help build employers’ capacity to support vocational opportunities for adults with DD. The search was conducted in EBSCO UAlberta Library, which automatically includes more than 50 electronic bibliographic databases. Two reviewers independently screened for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed study quality. Inclusion criteria were: (1) peer-reviewed literature, (2) English-language, (3) individuals with DD, and (4) employers and colleagues’ perspectives. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Findings from this study illustrated that involvement of support workers’ was viewed as the main strategy for building employer capacity. In addition, disability awareness training and education, and acknowledgment of psychosocial benefits associated with of employing individuals with disabilities were identified as supports. Employer concerns related to employees with disabilities were also identified. There is a significant body of literature on the value of supported employment and its significance for employers, as well as a few studies addressing perceived challenges associated with employing individuals with DD. Findings from this synthesis review notably indicate a lack of research focused on understanding employer’s perspectives of what is vital to develop their capacity to support vocational opportunities for adults with DD.

Co-Authors of the paper are: Sandra Hodgetts, David Nicholas

Lake Erie Room
5D
Care, Support and Treatment of People with a Developmental Disability and Challenging Behaviours – Capacity Building at its Best
Presenter: Jennifer Altosaar, Lisa Holmes, Jo-Ann Trahan, Darren Rene

The Community Networks of Specialized Care Ontario (CNSCO) has been involved in the coordination of the launch of the provincial Consensus Guidelines for the Care, Support and Treatment of People with a

Developmental Disability and Challenging Behaviours (referred to below as the “Guidelines”). This is a tool which can assist direct support professionals in better supporting some of our most vulnerable people through advocating for others, collaboration, holding people accountable, supporting interpersonal relationships, respect, managing change, relationship/networking and building resiliency; many of which are the core competencies referenced in the DS HR Strategy.

We have used a variety of methods to transfer this knowledge and share information with staff at all levels of the organization including:

  • Involvement of regional “champions” as resource members
  • Regional roll outs using the “Toolkit for Planning Educational Events”.
  • An annual conference for clinical service providers
  • A series of videoconference events

This presentation will highlight the development of a knowledge transfer plan, description of the different methods utilized to share the information and an overview of lessons learned from this approach to introducing new guidelines to the sector

Lake Huron Room
3:30pm Draw for mini-IPAD and FitBit
Open to any conference participant who stays
to the end of the day Thursday April 10th.
Participants are asked to gather in the ballroom
for a draw for a mini-IPAD and FitBit,
YOU MUST BE THERE TO GET THE PRIZE!
Foyer – Great Falls Ballroom

Information on the April 21st, 2017 RSIG seminar day is posted on their web-pages.